TVS subsidiary Norton announces EV motorcycle development project

University of Warwick is also on board, and will deal with battery technology and modelling.

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Norton is the latest manufacturer to announce plans for electric two-wheelers. The TVS-owned British marque said that it aims to bring to the market an electric two-wheeler that “riders desire” in a 30-month project.

  • Six partners in total considering different aspects of the design
  • Support the UK in its mission for a zero-emission automotive future

Norton EV Motorcycle: Project Zero Emissions Norton

Project Zero Emissions Norton aims to build an electric two-wheeler that doesn’t sacrifice performance for range.

Norton CEO Dr Robert Hentschel said the project would also put the UK on the map when it comes to EV components. The project is co-funded by the UK government’s Advanced Propulsion Centre 19 unit.

Considering the 30-month timeline forecasted by the company, the product should debut in late 2024 or early 2025. 

Norton EV project: partners onboard

Delta Cosworth, the electric powertrain division of the iconic engineering firm Cosworth, will be developing the battery pack that impacts not only the performance and range, but also the overall weight of the vehicle.

The University of Warwick (WMG), who already partners with Norton on a TTZero race bike project, are onboard as well. They will be tackling battery technology, modelling and tool chain development.

Motor and inverter specialists HiSpeed Ltd will be working on the motor design and manufacturing, while Formaplex Technologies, a Portsmouth-based carbon fibre and composites manufacturing firm, will be likely focusing on the bodywork of the new electric bike. 

M&I Materials will be handling the cooling system with a new method known as dielectric cooling, a process that involves immersion of electrical components in oil to cool them down.

Lastly, Indra Renewable Technologies specializes in vehicle to home charging technology, which transfers energy from your car to your home. Yet, this feature hasn’t been incorporated into an electric two-wheeler, but it is quite common in electric cars.

What do you expect from Norton’s electric bike in an ever-evolving electric bike market? Let us know in the comments section below.

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